Winter Dreams Summer Gardens 2021:
Nov. 5, 6 and 13

The Jackson County Master Gardener Association is back, virtually!

Dig into three days of virtual garden immersion seminars taught by 15 presenters, all designed to help you plan next year’s spectacular garden. Early November‘s Winter Dreams Summer Gardens Symposium is an ideal time to take stock while learning with experts about Gardening in Our Rogue Valley Climate, Berries, Vegetables, Native Plants, Hemp Research, Landscaping, Soils, Pruning, and more.

Dates:

Friday, Nov. 5, and Saturdays, Nov. 6 and 13, 2021

Cost:

$20. Pick your favorite topics or watch them all. Most recordings will be available for paid participants for a limited time.

Registration:

Please click on the button below to begin the registration process.  You will be contacted with details regarding how to connect to the sessions.

Registration deadline is Nov. 3.

If you have questions, or are having trouble with the registration process, please contact Keltie Nelson, 541-941-8584 or email: kknelson2@charter.net

Current Master Gardeners can earn recertification credits for all classes and professionals can earn continuing education hours from the Landscape Contractors Licensing Board.

Lecture Schedule

8:30 to 9:45 AM Lecture A1
Jamie Tramel, Ph.D.
Rogue Valley Climatology in the Future
10:00 to 11:15 AM Lecture A2
Rachel Werling, M.S.
iNaturalist Community Science for Beginners
11:30 AM to 12:45 PM Lecture A3
Neil Bell, M.S.
The 6 no-no’s of Pruning Ornamental Plants
1:15 to 2:30 PM Lecture A4
Bernadine Strik, Ph.D.
Growing Raspberries & Blueberries ~ Keys to Success
2:45 to 4:00 PM Lecture A5
Lynn Kuntsman, M.S.
Why Natives ~ Seven Steps to Restoring Biodiversity in Your Yard
8:30 to 9:45 AM Lecture B1
Eric Hagerman
The Nitty Gritty of Rock Gardening
10:00 to 11:15 AM Lecture B2
Robin McKenzie, BFA
Designing your Garden for Beauty and Biodiversity
11:30 AM to 12:45 PM Lecture B3
Gordon Jones, Ph.D.
Hemp research
1:15 to 2:30 PM Lecture B4
Suzie Savoie
Native Equivalents for Common Nursery Plants
2:45 to 4:00 PM Lecture B5
Lynn Kuntsman, M.S.
Growing Vegetables in the Rogue Valley
8:30 to 9:45 AM Lecture C1
Sherri Morgan
Transform Your Landscape into an Ecosystem Oasis
10:00 to 11:15 AM Lecture C2
Vincent Smith, Ph.D.
Mediterranean Climates: Plantings, Irrigation, and Water Conservation
11:30 AM to 12:45 PM Lecture C3
Rhianna Simes, M.S.Ed.
Regenerative Gardening
1:15 to 2:30 PM Lecture C4
Kristina Lefever
More than Pretty Flowers: the evolution of a native pollinator garden in downtown Phoenix
2:45 to 4:00 PM Lecture C5
John Kobal
Growing Vegetables in Raised Beds

Presenter Bios and Lecture Descriptions

Vincent Smith, Ph.D.

Dr. Vincent Smith is Director of the Division of Business, Communication, and the Environment at Southern Oregon University.

Dr. Smith’s research explores the complex coupled human-environment systems that shape the world in which we live. He is also the founder and faculty advisor for The Farm at SOU: A Center for Sustainability and a member of the SOU Sustainability Council. His work spans several traditional disciplinary boundaries including human ecology, environmental sociology, landscape ecology, agroecology, and human geography.

Presentation Description
The Rogue Valley has a classic Mediterranean climate despite its location in the Pacific Northwest.  Many gardeners, however, fail to recognize our region’s opportunities and limitations.  Join us as we explore a range of cold-hardy Mediterranean plants for our region including palms and citrus and how to appropriately water these plants to optimize water conservation and planting success.

John Kobal

John Kobal has 30+ years of gardening experience in both urban and rural settings.  His first garden was a 15-foot row of pole beans on a city lot.  He now enjoys living on a rural property with 18 raised beds and an orchard of apples, figs, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, cherries, apricots and persimmons.  John’s gardening knowledge has been fueled through numerous books and periodicals, lots of trials and experimentation, shared experiences in a community garden setting, and establishing his orchard.  John retired to the Rogue Valley and is a certified master gardener.

Presentation Description
Gardening in raised beds has its “ups and downs”.  The upside is designing your own soil, away from poor rocky, sandy, or clay native ground.  The downside is increased attention to critical factors like moisture and nutrients.  Gardening in elevated structures provides a number of benefits:  greater yield in less space, lower levels of resources, reduced maintenance, more cost effective in the long run, and less physical exertion.  Learn what materials to use, how to build your soil, planting schemes, watering, pest prevention, season extension, and annual upkeep.

Lynn Kunstman M.S.

Lynn Kunstman began vegetable gardening with her parents in Lafayette, California, as a young child. She has a degree in Wildlife Management from Humboldt State University and a Masters in Science Education from SOU. After teaching middle school special education and science for 22 years, she retired, and became a Master Gardener in 2012, and a Master Food Preserver in 2013. The backyard of her Medford home is dedicated to food gardening, where she grows vegetables, small fruits and fruit trees.

Presentation Descriptions

Growing Vegetables in the Rouge Valley (…not the Pacific Northwest): Our valley shares the same climate zone as the western slope of the Sierra foothills, so you can grow vegetables year round in the Rogue Valley. Learn techniques for seed selection, garden layout, extending the growing seasons in spring and fall, composting and more.  Reward yourself with fresh, healthy food, grown in your own backyard

Why Natives? – Seven Steps to Restoring Biodiversity in Your Yard: Planting native plants is crucial to ecosystem health and to preserving and protecting life on earth.  Plant choice matters, and choosing native plants helps to restore and ensure vital ecosystem services in our landscapes.   Based on the work of Dr. Doug Tallamy, This presentation outlines seven steps you can take to create healthy, productive gardens, and help save our disappearing pollinators and birds.

Robin McKenzie, BFA

Robin McKenzie is a landscape designer in Talent, OR. She specializes in “Living Landscape Design” which transforms urban landscapes traditionally dominated by lawn into sustainable ecosystems that benefit wildlife and people. She is also passionate about preserving our Western Monarch butterfly population.  An experienced and energetic speaker, Robin has appeared on national television, and has presented to many garden groups throughout Southern Oregon.  Robin has a BFA from CU Boulder and considers garden design one of the fine arts, with living plants for paint and the garden as her canvas.

Presentation Description
***Will Not Be Recorded***

Presented from an artistic and amateur scientific point of view, this course should appeal to all levels of butterfly, pollinator, gardening, and wildlife enthusiasts. The course is based on the premise that great beauty can be achieved while simultaneously enhancing biodiversity in our neighborhoods by planting a combination of native and other ornamental plants. We’ll discuss fundamentals of habitat, importance of healthy soil, basic design, growing from seed, and the concept of sustained bloom. This lively presentation is very image-intensive.

Eric Hagerman

Eric Hagerman comes from a family of gardeners, and has worked in the Green Industry for many years. The former Chair of the Siskiyou Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society, Eric enjoys spreading the glory of rock garden plants (and all other regionally appropriate plants) at his current place of employment: Shooting Star Nursery in Central Point.

Presentation Description
Gardeners have always been fascinated by rocks and the plants which grow within rocky landscapes. Southern Oregon is well known for its alpine plants and its rock gardens. Join us and learn the basics of using rocks in your garden, and some of the plants that do well with them.

Jamie Trammell, Ph.D.

Jamie Trammell is an Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at Southern Oregon University. He is trained as a landscape ecologist, and has been working on climate change models for nearly a decade. He specializes in visualizing climate and other drivers of ecosystems using maps and geospatial technology.

Presentation Description
What do the climate models suggest for the Rogue Valley in the future? More heat stress, less water? More rain, less snow? During this session we will summarize what the latest models show for the Rogue Valley, and how we can use this information to begin planning for the future today.

Suzie Savoie

Suzie Savoie is co-owner of Siskiyou Ecological Services and Klamath-Siskiyou Native Seeds and is the Conservation Chair for the Siskiyou Chapter Native Plant Society of Oregon. She was co-author of Native Pollinator Plants for Southern Oregon and an editor of The Siskiyou Crest: Hikes, History & Ecology.  Suzie provides native seed collection services, online native seed sales, native nursery plants, and native plant consultation. For nearly 20 years she has been using native plants for gardens and habitat restoration on her property in the Applegate Valley, and she enjoys helping others do the same.

Presentation Description
Did you know that non-native ornamental plants support 29 times less biodiversity than native ornamentals? Unfortunately, most plants sold in nurseries are not native. Come learn how to help native pollinators and biodiversity by growing native equivalents for common nursery plants such as coneflowers, asters, lupines, checkermallow, turtlehead, joepiweed, fuchsia, clematis, honeysuckle, redbud and much more!

Neil Bell, M.S.

Neil Bell is retired as the Community Horticulturist for OSU Extension Service in Marion County and Polk County. From 2000-2021 he coordinated the Master Gardener programs in both counties, specializing in pruning of ornamental plants, plant problem diagnosis and drought-tolerant landscaping. He now works 1 day per week for OSU Extension, assisting with a newly planted evaluation of approximately 110 olive cultivars and an evaluation of drought-tolerant broadleaved evergreen groundcovers at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center in Aurora. He lives with his wife Bernadine on 5 acres west of Monmouth where they garden with deer, poison oak and not a lot of water.

Presentation Description
Pruning requirements of ornamental plants used in landscapes vary depending on flowering time and growth habit and these characteristics determine pruning requirement. Unfortunately, often these characteristics are ignored and impromptu pruning techniques are employed which diminish (or eliminate) the aesthetic appeal of the plant and may even affect its health and longevity. In this presentation we’ll look at 6 common mistakes seen in landscapes and discuss more appropriate ways to prune.

Kristina Lefever

Kristina Lefever moved to the Rogue Valley in 2012 and immediately became enamored with the region’s native plants and pollinators. She joined Pollinator Project Rogue Valley (PPRV) in 2014 with a goal of making Ashland a Bee City USA. Kristina is now Chair of Bee City USA Ashland, President of PPRV, and also a board member of Beyond Toxics. Her dream is that everyone’s property will include a little or a lot of pollinator habitat, even if it’s just a pot of California poppies on the porch.

Presentation Description
Imagine you are given the worst piece of ground to create a garden – hot, dry, south facing, along a sidewalk, and busy road. What would you do? Why not make a beautiful garden, and make a statement at the same time! Join Kristina Lefever of Pollinator Project Rogue Valley as she shares the transition of the garden over the last two years – the plants, the pollinators, and the people.

Rachel Werling, M.S.

Rachel Werling is a native-plant botanist and president of the Siskiyou Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Oregon. She is the faculty coordinator of the Land Steward Program for Oregon State University’s Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center.

Presentation Description
iNaturalist is a fun and powerful community science tool that is like having a Naturalist in your pocket. We will learn the simple and quick way to use the app to answer such questions as: What is this plant? What flowers will I see on this trail in June? What is this bug? Then, we will see how you can dive deeper into the iNaturalist rabbit hole, helping science and learning as you go.  Our focus will be on wildland plants, but it can be used for horticultural species as well. You will need a smart phone with the iNaturalist app downloaded to get the most out of the class. A Community for Naturalists · iNaturalist for information.

Bernadine Strik, Ph.D.

Dr. Bernadine Strik is Professor of Horticulture at Oregon State University, Dr. Strik will cover key steps needed to successfully grow blueberries and raspberries in your home garden soil or raised beds. Dr. Strik is a world renowned berry crop expert who has an active interest and involvement in supporting home horticulture programs.

Presentation Description
Learn how to avoid common problems and be able to harvest delicious berries! Come prepared with your berry good questions.

The new home garden publications:

https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/ec1304

https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/ec1306

And the new pruning modules for blueberry and raspberry (also for other berries):

https://workspace.oregonstate.edu/course/pruning-series

Gordon Jones, Ph.D.

Gordon Jones is extension agriculture faculty at the OSU Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center located in the Rogue Valley. He holds a B.S. in Sustainable Agriculture from Warren Wilson College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences from Virginia Tech. Gordon conducts research, teaches extension classes, and provides technical assistance around pasture, hay, and hemp management, soil fertility, cover crops, and pesticide stewardship in Jackson and Josephine counties.

Presentation Description
Over the past several years, hemp production has dramatically altered the agricultural landscape in the Rogue Valley. From the roadside it seems like we see different things going on each season. In this session, we’ll discuss the recent changes in hemp production in Jackson County, explain some of the farming practices used, and give you some tips on understanding what you might be seeing across the fence or from the roadside.

Rhianna Simes, M.S.Ed.

Rhianna Simes grew up on her family’s 100 acre farm and vineyard in central Texas. Rhianna recently retired from 10 years as an instructor at the Oregon State University Extension Service, where she developed the Land Steward program, Citizen Fire Academy, and also coordinated the Master Gardener program (MG class of 2007). She has a Master’s of Science in Education and Botany from Southern Oregon University.

Rhianna lives with her husband and two young children outside Talent, OR where they operate their own 1 acre, educational mini-farm called Verdant Phoenix (specializing in organic plant starts, perennial food, healthy soil and natural farming). Rhianna serves on the board for the Southern Oregon Seed Growers Association, Cultivate Oregon, and coordinates the Rogue Seed Keepers. She is currently the Chair for the Rogue Valley Food System Network Council. Rhianna is a plant nerd who is passionate about local food, seed sovereignty, and building community!

Presentation Description
Come learn about the new – old – way to garden. People have been doing this a long time.  This is beyond sustainable gardening – this is gardening that actually leaves the soil and ecosystem Better than when you found it.  We will discuss strategies for soil building, plant selection, encouraging wildlife, seed saving, and for caring for your garden in each season.  This fun class is all about what to do in your garden to regenerate a healthy natural environment that thrives in Southern Oregon.

Sherri Morgan

Sherri Morgan is a Jackson County Master Gardener, Class of 2008.  She has taught in the Practicum program for Master Gardeners since 2009.  She is a landscape designer, specializing in the use of native plants in her designs.

Presentation Description
Participants will learn the value of native plants for our ecosystem, and will be guided in the process of transforming their personal landscapes by introducing native trees, shrubs and perennials.  Site analysis and design techniques will be described.